Monthly Archives: September 2014
National Cyber Awareness System Alert

We recently learned about an industry-wide security vulnerability that impacts many common Linux and Unix platforms. This vulnerability, known as Shellshock, could allow an attacker to gain remote access to systems or execute malicious code remotely. Given the implications of this flaw, we wanted to alert you to this vulnerability and assure you that Enom has proactively applied the necessary security patches to all of our servers that could have been vulnerable. Our core systems remain unaffected and our team will continue to monitor the situation and apply new security patches as they are released. If you are using or selling our Linux hosting product, there has been no evidence of any exploits. We recommend that our Unix and Linux-based customers apply all available patches to their own computers before using any Bash-based tools (SSH) to remotely connect to their Linux hosting accounts.

Have questions? Here are some FAQs on Shellshock:

What is the Shellshock flaw?
It is a vulnerability in Bash, the software used to control the command shell in many flavors of Unix-based systems, which has been shown to be present in Linux and other Unix operating systems online task management. The flaw could allow an attacker to gain remote access to systems or execute malicious code remotely.

Is there any evidence my Linux hosting account has been compromised by this exploit?
If you are using or selling our Linux hosting product there is no evidence from our scans of any exploits. We have patched our systems and will continue to monitor the situation and apply new security patches as they are made available.

I use your Windows hosting product – does this impact me?
No, this vulnerability only impacts Linux and Unix-based operating systems.

Am I vulnerable?
Windows desktop users are not vulnerable. If you use Linux or a Mac as your desktop environment then you may be at risk for this exploit. If you allow SSH access from remote connections or run a local webserver then you are potentially vulnerable. We recommend that our Unix and Linux-based customers apply all available patches to their own computers before using any Bash-based tools (SSH) to remotely connect to their Linux hosting accounts.

How is this being addressed by companies that utilize Bash (e.g., Apple, Red Hat, etc.)?
The majority of the Linux distributions have released an initial patch for Bash. This is only an initial patch and we expect additional patches to be released.

Where can I get more information on Shellshock?
To get more information on Shellshock, please reference the following organizations:

 

743: North Carolina approves second area code for Piedmont Triad

336-74310-digit local calling, additional area code, coming to Triad

State officials approved a second area code for the Piedmont Triad that will overlay the current 336 code. The new 743 overlay for area code will be implemented before all numbers in that area code are exhausted, expected to be in 2016.

Officials from the North Carolina Utilities Commission announced on Wednesday, August 20th, 2014 that the 743 area code has been approved for use. Local phone providers will provide details later on when the new area code will start, commission officials said.

The new area code will mean all local calls will require 10-digit dialing. However, local calls with both area codes will remain free.

Customers who already have 336 numbers will be allowed to keep them. The new area code will be used primarily for issuing new numbers.

The new area code is needed because all available 336 numbers are expected to be used up by 2016, commission officials said.

The Raleigh and Charlotte areas already have two overlay area codes.